The Exoplanet Exploration Program Analysis Group (ExoPAG) is responsible for soliciting and coordinating community input into the development and execution of NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP). It serves as a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for soliciting and coordinating community analysis and input in support of the Exoplanet Exploration Program objectives and of their implications for architecture planning and activity prioritization and for future exploration. It provides findings of analyses to the NASA Astrophysics Division Director.

Executive Committee:

ExoPAG activities and meetings are organized through an Executive Committee, selected by NASA HQ through a Dear Colleague letter. Appointments are made annually to replace members rotating off; the normal term is 3 years. If you are interested in serving on the Executive Committee, please contact the ExoPAG Executive Secretary at NASA HQ (Hannah Jang-Condell, Deputy Exoplanet Exploration Program Scientist).

New Executive Committee members for 2022: Diana Dragomir, Erin May, Bertrand Mennesson, and John Wisniewski.


ExoPAG News and Announcements (September 16, 2022)

  1. NN-EXPLORE Minerva-Australis Informational Session (September 21, 2022, 6pm EDT/3pm PDT)
  2. NN-EXPLORE in 2023A: Time Available on the WIYN 3.5m, CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with CHIRON, MINERVA-Australis, and Support for Community Observing with High Resolution Imaging on WIYN, Gemini-North, and Gemini-South (Proposals due September 30, 2022)
  3. ROSES-22 Amendment 47: Release of Strategic Astrophysics Technology Final Text and Due Dates
  4. 2023A NASA IRTF Call for Proposals (deadline October 3, 2022)
  5. 2023 Astrophysics Probe Explorer (APEX) DRAFT Announcement of Opportunity Released for Community Comment (Comments Due September 29, 2022)
  6. Rocky Worlds Discussions
+ more

1) NN-EXPLORE Minerva-Australis Informational Session (September 21, 2022, 6pm EDT/3pm PDT)

NASA and the NSF provide US community access to the Minerva-Australis facility. 300 hours of time per semester are available to community and applications are through the NOIRLab NNExplore process (https://noirlab.edu/science/observing-noirlab/proposals/nn-explorenexsc) and information about the facility can be found at NExScI (https://nexsci.caltech.edu/missions/Minerva/). Proposals are due as the normal part of the NOIRLab cycle on 30 September 2022.

To help the community understand better the capabilities of the facility, we are holding an hour-long informational meeting via zoom on Wednesday 21 September 2022 at 1500h US PDT (1800h US EDT) = Wednesday 21 September 2022 2200h UT = Thursday 22 September 2022 0800h AEST.

The zoom link for the informational meeting is

Meeting URL:
https://caltech.zoom.us/j/82151133478?pwd=eU5rMGRUT2hES0IycVJPQjBMUnp4QT09

Meeting ID: 821 5113 3478

Passcode: 333560

For more information, please contact one of the following


2) NN-EXPLORE in 2023A: Time Available on the WIYN 3.5m, CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with CHIRON, MINERVA-Australis, and Support for Community Observing with High Resolution Imaging on WIYN, Gemini-North, and Gemini-South (Proposals due September 30, 2022)

NN-EXPLORE proposals are invited for the WIYN 3.5m, CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with CHIRON, and MINERVA-Australis in semester 2023A (1 February 2023 – 31 July 2023.) through the NOIRLab call for proposals:

https://noirlab.edu/science/observing-noirlab/proposals/call-for-proposals
(see Sec 3.4 for NN-EXPLORE opportunities)

Proposal Deadline: 30 September 2022 at 11:59pm Mountain Standard Time (MST)

For further details on the NN-EXPLORE time and available instruments, see:
https://noirlab.edu/science/observing-noirlab/proposals/nn-explore/

NOIRLab proposals must be anonymized. Instructions for PIs can be found on the Anonymization page: https://noirlab.edu/science/observing-noirlab/proposals/anonymization-instructions

Update on status of Kitt Peak National Observatory after Contreras Fire:
https://noirlab.edu/public/news/noirlab2213/

* WIYN 3.5m

The NNEXPLORE program continues on the WIYN 3.5m, with 35 nights available for exoplanet programs - including the precision RV instrument NEID: https://www.wiyn.org/Instruments/wiynneid.html and https://www.wiyn.org/Observe/wiynstatus.html . WIYN selections come with modest monetary award for analysis, publications costs and incidental expenses. https://www.wiyn.org/

* CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m+CHIRON

NNEXPLORE offers observing time on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with the precision radial-velocity spectrometer CHIRON, with 300 hours (equivalent to 30 nights of service observing) of observing time in 2023A. For more information on the SMARTS 1.5m telescope and CHIRON contact Todd Henry (thyenry@astro.gsu.edu , http://www.astro.gsu.edu/~thenry/SMARTS/) and see the recent paper by Paredes et al. (2021, AJ, 162, 176): https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2021AJ....162..176P/abstract.

* MINERVA-Australis

[NOTE: The MINERVA-Australis team will have a 1 hour-long information session on Wednesday, September 21, 2022 at 6pm EDT/3pm PDT for anyone interested in learning more about M-A. See previous news item.]

As part of the NNEXPLORE program, NASA is continuing in a partnership with the MINERVA-Australis consortium that began in 2020B. That agreement continues in Semester 2023A, with 300 hours of observing time open to NNEXPLORE proposals. MINERVA-Australis is a dedicated exoplanet observatory operated by the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) in Queensland, Australia. The facility is located at USQ's Mt. Kent Observatory, and saw first light in quarter two 2018; commissioning of the facility was completed in mid-2019. MINERVA-Australis currently consists of 5 (0.7m) PlaneWave CDK700 telescopes; these telescopes have two ports, allowing each to be used for either spectroscopic or photometric observations. A summary of the facility and its capabilities can be found in the commissioning paper by Addison et al. 2019
(https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2019PASP..131k5003A)
The photometric channel is capable of milli-magnitude precision and currently, the light from four telescopes can be combined onto one R=75,000 echelle spectrograph for radial velocity precisions of 1 -10 m/s depending on the target brightness and how many telescopes are combined.

Note on Restrictions to MINERVA-Australis Call

NASA has made available to the US community 300 hours on the Minerva-Australis facility for the 2023A semester. The time is intended for exoplanet research, primarily of TESS targets but other exoplanet science will be considered. Proposed observing time will be allocated in hours and must include all science and calibration observations necessary to accomplish the science. More information can be requested by contacting David Ciardi at NExScI (ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu) or Rob Wittenmyer at University of Southern Queensland (Rob.Wittenmyer@usq.edu.au).

As the MINERVA-Australis is a scientific consortium, there are a set of restrictions by which proposers must abide:

  • The MINERVA-Australis has listed a set of “Collaboration Targets,” which are a set of targets that the collaboration is observing (see https://drive.google.com/file/d/1M4ee7qRmhMoldLqbngZD7qXMOQSzZvhV/view?usp=sharing__;!!PvBDto6Hs4WbVuu7!bQiLiXo3BVwkHQbR0BcXUQQTSbPCmfGjwn_M_AxEcZRASVtWNWsoGnp5bhGUX7dS24dGjMrw$ ) “Collaboration Targets” can be proposed for observation through the NASA time if the proposal principal investigator forms a collaboration with the appropriate MINERVA-Australis collaboration or the proposer and the MINERVA-Australis collaboration member come to a mutual agreement regarding the proposed observations.
  • Observations will be made, on behalf of the NASA observers, in queue-mode by the MINERVA-Australis team.
  • The MINERVA-Australis team will deliver the proposer’s raw data, 1D extracted spectra, and radial velocities (if desired by the proposer).
  • Data obtained for US community observers will be archived at NExScI –through the ExoFOP service (https://exofop.ipac.caltech.edu/tess/). Archived data will have the option to have a maximum 12 month proprietary period.
  • Any publications arising from the utilization of NASA time on MINERVA-Australis are subject to the main MINERVA-Australis publication policy regarding the inclusion of the listed Architects and Builders [to be provided by the Collaboration] and must acknowledge the NN-EXPLORE Program.

* High Resolution Imaging on WIYN, Gemini-North and Gemini-South

NN-EXPLORE is supporting community observations with three high-resolution imagers - NESSI on WIYN, 'Alopeke on Gemini-North and Zorro on Gemini-South. In speckle mode they provide simultaneous two-color diffraction-limited optical imaging (FWHM~0.02" at 650nm) of targets as faint as V~13/17 over a 1.2" field of view. Wide-field mode provides simultaneous two-color imaging in standard SDSS filters over a 60" field of view. For further information see https://www.wiyn.org/Instruments/wiynnessi.html,https://www.gemini.edu/instrumentation/alopeke-zorro and contact the PI: Steve Howell (NASA Ames Research Center)steve.b.howell@nasa.gov. See also the paper on `Alopeke and Zorro by Scott et al. (2021, Fron. Astro. & Space Sci., 8, 138; https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2021FrASS...8..138S/). The full 2023A Gemini call for proposals is at https://www.gemini.edu/observing/phase-i/standard-semester-program/2023a-call-proposals.


3) ROSES-22 Amendment 47: Release of Strategic Astrophysics Technology Final Text and Due Dates

The focus of the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program (https://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?solId=%7b14958525-AA09-111E-59C2-5BBF6585F7AA%7d&path=&method=init) is maturation of key technologies for incorporation into future strategic astrophysics flight missions. The SAT program is designed to support the maturation of technologies whose feasibility has already been demonstrated to the point where they can be incorporated into NASA flight missions. The search for and study of planets outside the Solar System, the origin and evolution of the Universe, and the birth of stars and galaxies are all represented within the SAT program. Compared to prior versions, this updated version of the text includes, in Section 1.3, a revision of the Specific Technology Development Exclusions.

ROSES-2022 Amendment 47 releases final text and due dates for D.7 SAT. Mandatory Notices of Intent are due October 21, 2022, and proposals are due December 15, 2022.

On or about September 12, 2022, this Amendment to the NASA Research Announcement "Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2022" (NNH22ZDA001N) will be posted on the NASA research opportunity homepage at https://solicitation.nasaprs.com/ROSES2022 and will appear on SARA's ROSES blog at:https://science.nasa.gov/researchers/sara/grant-solicitations/roses-2022/

Questions concerning D.7 SAT (https://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?solId=%7b14958525-AA09-111E-59C2-5BBF6585F7AA%7d&path=&method=init) may be directed to mario.perez@nasa.gov, the main point of contact concerning this program, or to any of the points of contact for the three science themes:


4) 2023A NASA IRTF Call for Proposals (deadline October 3, 2022)

The call for NASA Infrared Telescope Facility semester 2023A observing proposals has been released:http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/observing/callForProposals.php

Proposal Deadline for Semester 2023A (February 1, 2023 to July 31, 2023) is Monday, October 3, 2022, 5PM Hawaii Standard Time.

Available instruments are listed here: http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/instruments/. Remote observing is offered from any location with broadband Internet access for any project that utilizes IRTF facility instruments.

Click here (http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/observing/computer/) for information about IRTF Computer and Remote Observing Information.

Please see the announcement for available instruments and for further information. Please review the information and use our Online Application Form (http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/observing/applicationForms.php).


5) 2023 Astrophysics Probe Explorer (APEX) DRAFT Announcement of Opportunity Released for Community Comment (Comments Due September 29, 2022)

Release Date: August 16, 2022
Comments Due: September 29, 2022
Identification Number: NNH22ZDA015J

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is announcing via this email the release of a draft text for community review and comment entitled “Draft Announcement of Opportunity (AO): 2023 Astrophysics Probe Explorer (APEX).” To find the full draft text visit http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ and select “Solicitations” at the top of the page and search on “NNH22ZDA015J” or use this direct link https://go.nasa.gov/Hertz15.

The National Academies’ 2020 Decadal Survey in Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pathways to Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics for the 2020s at https://www.nap.edu/catalog/26141/pathways-to-discovery-in-astronomy-and-astrophysics-for-the-2020s, recommends probe missions to be competed in broad areas identified as important to accomplish the survey’s scientific goals. For the coming decade, the Decadal Survey recommends a far-infrared mission or an X-ray mission. Responses to the Astrophysics Probe Explorer Draft AO will be limited to one of the two mission themes recommended by the Decadal Survey. These areas are:

  • A far infrared imaging or spectroscopy mission, and
  • An X-ray probe.

Proposals must be responsive to the preponderance of the mission theme's objectives as provided in Sections 7.5.3.2 through 7.5.3.4 of the Decadal Survey.

Participation is open to all categories of organizations or institutions, U.S. or non-U.S., including educational, industrial, and not-for-profit institutions, Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs) including the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), University Affiliated Research Centers (UARCs), NASA Centers, and other Government agencies.

The issuance of the 2023 APEX Draft AO does not obligate NASA to issue a final 2023 APEX AO that solicits proposals. Any costs incurred by prospective investigators in preparing submissions in response to any draft solicitation are incurred at the submitter's own risk.

Please address comments or questions on the draft AO only via email to the APEX Lead Program Scientist: Dr. Patricia M. Knezek (subject line to read "APEX DRAFT AO”) at: patricia.m.knezek@nasa.gov. Responses to individual comments may be given by email or posted in the Q&As (Questions and Answers) section of the Astrophysics Explorers Program Acquisition website:https://explorers.larc.nasa.gov/2023APPROBE/. Anonymity of persons or institutions submitting questions will be preserved. The comment period for the draft AO ends on September 29, 2022.


6) Rocky Worlds Discussions

"Dear all,

We are launching a new virtual meeting series "Rocky Worlds Discussions" (https://discussions.rockyworlds.org/) to bring together planetary scientists, astronomers, and earth scientists to pave the way for the next decade of interdisciplinary rocky exoplanet discovery and characterisation. Rocky Worlds Discussions aims to grow a globally connected community that meets for seminars followed by discussion on a monthly basis. We aim to foster a lively debate on the major questions cutting across the communities of exoplanet astronomy, planetary science, and astrobiology. All meetings are conducted virtually via Zoom. The meeting series is hosted by Tim Lichtenberg, Amy Bonsor, Oliver Shorttle, Robin Wordsworth, Sarah Hörst, Hiroyuki Kurokawa, and Rebecca Fischer. The first thematic meetings will be introduced by talks from the following speakers: 6 October 2022, 13.00 UTC: Anat Shahar (Carnegie EPL) – An Interdisciplinary (Preliminary) Understanding of Planetary Evolution 3 November 2022, 13.00 UTC: Simon Lock (U Bristol) – Impact-driven atmospheric loss from terrestrial planets 1 December 2022, 15:00 UTC: Sujoy Mukhopadhyay (UC Davis) – Volatile accretion and evolution in the terrestrial planets The up-to-date meeting schedule can be found at: https://discussions.rockyworlds.org/meetings. You can join the discussion mailing list and further community spaces at: https://discussions.rockyworlds.org/join. We look forward to seeing you at Rocky Worlds Discussions!

Amy Bonsor, Tim Lichtenberg, Oliver Shorttle, Sarah Horst, Robin Wordsworth, Hiroyuki Kurokawa, Rebecca Fischer"


ExoPAG News and Announcements (September 3, 2022)

  1. NN-EXPLORE in 2023A: Time Available on the WIYN 3.5m, CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with CHIRON, MINERVA-Australis, and Support for Community Observing with High Resolution Imaging on WIYN, Gemini-North, and Gemini-South (Proposals due September 30, 2022)
  2. NASA SMD Seeks Volunteer Reviewers for Research Proposals
  3. Origins of Solar Systems Gordon Research Seminar: Constraining the Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems Through a Multidisciplinary Approach (June 10-11, 2023) and Origins of Solar Systems Gordon Research Conference: Chemical and Dynamical Constraints on Planet Formation (June 11-16, 2023)

+ more

1) NN-EXPLORE in 2023A: Time Available on the WIYN 3.5m, CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with CHIRON, MINERVA-Australis, and Support for Community Observing with High Resolution Imaging on WIYN, Gemini-North, and Gemini-South (Proposals due September 30, 2022)

NN-EXPLORE proposals are invited for the WIYN 3.5m, CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with CHIRON, and MINERVA-Australis in semester 2023A (1 February 2023 – 31 July 2023.) through the NOIRLab call for proposals:

* WIYN 3.5m

The NNEXPLORE program continues on the WIYN 3.5m, with 35 nights available for exoplanet programs - including the precision RV instrument NEID: https://www.wiyn.org/Instruments/wiynneid.html and https://www.wiyn.org/Instruments/wiynneid_call2022b.html. WIYN selections come with modest monetary award for analysis, publications costs and incidental expenses. https://www.wiyn.org/

* CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m+CHIRON)

NNEXPLORE offers observing time on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5m with the precision radial-velocity spectrometer CHIRON, with 300 hours (equivalent to 30 nights of service observing) of observing time in 2023A. For more information on the SMARTS 1.5m telescope and CHIRON contact Todd Henry (thenry@astro.gsu.edu, http://www.astro.gsu.edu/~thenry/SMARTS/) and see the recent paper by Paredes et al. (2021, AJ, 162, 176): https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2021AJ....162..176P/abstract.

* MINERVA-Australis

[NOTE: The MINERVA-Australis team will have a 1 hour-long information session on Wednesday, September 21, 2022 at 3pm PDT for anyone interested in learning more about M-A. Zoom connection information for the information session and updated information on spectroscopy and photometry with M-A will be posted around September 6th at the MINERVA-Australis NExScI website https://nexsci.caltech.edu/missions/Minerva/.]

As part of the NNEXPLORE program, NASA is continuing in a partnership with the MINERVA-Australis consortium that began in 2020B. That agreement continues in Semester 2023A, with 300 hours of observing time open to NNEXPLORE proposals. MINERVA-Australis is a dedicated exoplanet observatory operated by the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) in Queensland, Australia. The facility is located at USQ's Mt. Kent Observatory, and saw first light in quarter two 2018; commissioning of the facility was completed in mid-2019. MINERVA-Australis currently consists of 5 (0.7m) PlaneWave CDK700 telescopes; these telescopes have two ports, allowing each to be used for either spectroscopic or photometric observations. A summary of the facility and its capabilities can be found in the commissioning paper by Addison et al. 2019

(https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2019PASP..131k5003A)

The photometric channel is capable of milli-magnitude precision and currently, the light from four telescopes can be combined onto one R=75,000 echelle spectrograph for radial velocity precisions of 1 -10 m/s depending on the target brightness and how many telescopes are combined.

Note on Restrictions to MINERVA-Australis Call

NASA has made available to the US community 300 hours on the Minerva-Australis facility for the 2023A semester. The time is intended for exoplanet research, primarily of TESS targets but other exoplanet science will be considered. Proposed observing time will be allocated in hours and must include all science and calibration observations necessary to accomplish the science. More information can be requested by contacting David Ciardi at NExScI (ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu) or Rob Wittenmyer at University of Southern Queensland (Rob.Wittenmyer@usq.edu.au).

As the MINERVA-Australis is a scientific consortium, there are a set of restrictions by which proposers must abide:

• The MINERVA-Australis has listed a set of “Collaboration Targets,” which are a set of targets that the collaboration is observing (seehttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1M4ee7qRmhMoldLqbngZD7qXMOQSzZvhV/view?usp=sharing__;!!PvBDto6Hs4WbVuu7!bQiLiXo3BVwkHQbR0BcXUQQTSbPCmfGjwn_M_AxEcZRASVtWNWsoGnp5bhGUX7dS24dGjMrw$

“Collaboration Targets” can be proposed for observation through the NASA time if the proposal principal investigator forms a collaboration with the appropriate MINERVA-Australis collaboration or the proposer and the MINERVA-Australis collaboration member come to a mutual agreement regarding the proposed observations.

• Observations will be made, on behalf of the NASA observers, in queue-mode by the MINERVA-Australis team.

• The MINERVA-Australis team will deliver the proposer’s raw data, 1D extracted spectra, and radial velocities (if desired by the proposer).

• Data obtained for US community observers will be archived at NExScI –through the ExoFOP service (https://exofop.ipac.caltech.edu/tess/). Archived data will have the option to have a maximum 12 month proprietary period.

• Any publications arising from the utilization of NASA time on MINERVA-Australis are subject to the main MINERVA-Australis publication policy regarding the inclusion of the listed Architects and Builders [to be provided by the Collaboration] and must acknowledge the NN-EXPLORE Program.

* High Resolution Imaging on WIYN, Gemini-North and Gemini-South

NN-EXPLORE is supporting community observations with three high-resolution imagers - NESSI on WIYN, 'Alopeke on Gemini-North and Zorro on Gemini-South. In speckle mode they provide simultaneous two-color diffraction-limited optical imaging (FWHM~0.02" at 650nm) of targets as faint as V~13/17 over a 1.2" field of view. Wide-field mode provides simultaneous two-color imaging in standard SDSS filters over a 60" field of view. For further information see https://www.wiyn.org/Instruments/wiynnessi.html, https://www.gemini.edu/instrumentation/alopeke-zorro and contact the PI: Steve Howell (NASA Ames Research Center) steve.b.howell@nasa.gov. See also the paper on `Alopeke and Zorro by Scott et al. (2021, Fron. Astro. & Space Sci., 8, 138; https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2021FrASS...8..138S/). The full 2023A Gemini call for proposals is at https://www.gemini.edu/observing/phase-i/standard-semester-program/2023a-call-proposals.


2) NASA SMD Seeks Volunteer Reviewers for Research Proposals

NASA's Science Mission Directorate is seeking subject matter experts to serve as external (email) and/or virtual panel reviewers of proposals to the "ROSES" research solicitation. All of the reviewer volunteer forms may be accessed on the main landing page at https://science.nasa.gov/researchers/volunteer-review-panels or just follow the links below to the volunteer review forms. Once on a form, click the boxes to indicate the topics in which you consider yourself to be a subject matter expert. If your skills match our needs for that review and there are not too many organizational conflicts of interest, we will contact you to discuss scheduling.

A wide range of volunteer reviewer web forms have been (re)posted recently including

  • Heliophysics Technology and Instrument Development for Science
  • Heliophysics Early Career Investigator Program
  • Weather and Atmospheric Dynamics
  • Emerging Worlds
  • Solar System Workings
  • Planetary Data Archiving and Restoration
  • Exobiology
  • Solar System Observations
  • Mars Data Analysis Program
  • Discovery Data Analysis
  • Planetary Instrument Concepts for the Advancement of Solar System Observations (PICASSO)
  • Planetary Protection Research
  • Astrophysics Data Analysis Program
  • Astrophysics Research and Analysis
  • Theoretical and Computational Astrophysics Networks
  • Habitable Worlds
  • Earth Surface and Interior and Space Geodesy Programs
  • The New Frontiers Data Analysis Program
  • The Physical Oceanography Program

3) Origins of Solar Systems Gordon Research Seminar: Constraining the Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems Through a Multidisciplinary Approach (June 10-11, 2023) and Origins of Solar Systems Gordon Research Conference: Chemical and Dynamical Constraints on Planet Formation (June 11-16, 2023)


ExoPAG News and Announcements (August 22, 2022)

  1. Precursor Science Workshop II Delayed Until October 11-13, 2022
  2. Call for ExoExplorers 2023 (Deadline September 22, 2022)
  3. Call for ExoGuides 2023 (Deadline September 16, 2022)
  4. Astrophysics Mission Design School (Duration: January 30-April 14, 2023; Application Deadline September 28, 2022)
  5. Two Astrophysics Medium Explorer Missions and Two Explorer Missions of Opportunity Selected for Mission Concept Studies
  6. 2023 Kavli-IAU Astrochemistry Symposium. Astrochemistry VIII - From the First Galaxies to the Formation of Habitable Worlds (July 10-14, 2023, Traverse City, MI, USA)
+ more

1) Precursor Science Workshop II Delayed Until October 11-13, 2022

From NASA Astrophysics Division Director Dr. Mark Clampin:

Due to conflicts with other meetings, the precursor science workshop will be rescheduled by 5 weeks from September 7-9 to October 11-13, 2022. With the appointment of a new Astrophysics Division Director this also provides the opportunity to re-assess the workshop’s priorities and alignment with planned GOMAP activities. The workshop will retain its all-virtual format.”

From Dr. Eric Smith and the rest of the workshop organizing committee:

"While the structure of the meeting has been decided, with the delay in the meeting dates we will need to re-confirm speakers for the new dates. The organizing committee will aim to post the updated agenda within the next two weeks. We ask those interested in attending, whether they previously registered or not, to please re-register athttps://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdSEWD3dNf1TsdQWu81wH4lK7vZr4HLe4ilDFef4tfQjoS3Vg/viewform. Thank you."

For further information and future updates, please see the Precursor Science Workshop II website:https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/astro2020-precursor-sci-workshop2/


2) Call for ExoExplorers 2023 (Deadline September 22, 2022)

Call for ExoExplorer Applications 2023

https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/exopag/exoexplorers/exoexplorers-call/

Program Description

The ExoExplorers program, sponsored by NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program Office and the ExoPAG Executive Committee, will focus on the professional development of ~12 graduate student and/or postdoc researchers (“ExoExplorers”) at US and international[1] institutions. Each member of the cohort will be featured in a webinar that will be live-streamed to the exoplanet community, helping to increase their visibility within the field and build internal and external research networks. The cohort will also learn from the experiences of established exoplanet researchers and engineers in the field (“ExoGuides”) via a combination of tailored presentations and small group discussions.

Members of this cohort, which will run from January 2023 to June 2023, will each give one 30-minute presentation on their research to the broader exoplanet community. Each of the ExoExplorers will receive $1,000 for the purchase of one presentation of their research results, presented as a part of the Science Series.

In addition, the ExoExplorers will be invited to participate in:

  1. Weekly interactions between members of the cohort
  2. Monthly informal group discussions with prominent scientists (“ExoGuides”) in the fields of exoplanet science and engineering
  3. One-on-one meetings with two to five researchers requested by the ExoExplorer, facilitated by the Organizing Committee
  4. Two to four professional development events on topics to be decided by the cohort, such as proposal writing, establishing inclusive collaborations, career building, and public speaking
  5. The development and/or execution of cohort-driven activities pertaining to diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility (DEIA) and/or exoplanet science and engineering
  6. Mentorship opportunities with the organizers of the ExoExplorers program.

The activities described above will largely be shaped by the unique interests and needs of the cohort. Therefore, we seek applicants who are actively seeking to enrich and enhance their exoplanet science and DEIA in the broader exoplanet community via engaging with each other, as well as with the ExoGuides and the ExoExplorer program organizers.

[1] NASA places restrictions on interactions with several countries: Iran, Syria, North Korea, and China. If you are a citizen of one of these countries or are currently affiliated with an institution in one of these countries, please see our FAQ page (https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/exopag/exoexplorers/exoexplorers-faq/) for additional details/restrictions on applying.

Applications are due Thursday September 22, 2022 at 5 PM Pacific.

For further information, including application instructions, FAQ, Code of Conduct, please visit:

https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/exopag/exoexplorers/exoexplorers-call/


3) Call for ExoGuides 2023 (Deadline September 16, 2022)

ExoGuide Call 2023

https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/exopag/exoexplorers/exoexplorers-exoguide-call/

This ExoExplorers program, sponsored by NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program Office and the ExoPAG Executive Committee, will focus on the professional development of ~12 graduate student and/or postdoc researchers (“ExoExplorers”) by raising their visibility in the exoplanet community via a series of public talks, helping them build internal and external research networks, and providing them with an opportunity to learn from the experiences of you and your fellow ExoGuides. Please see the following page for more details on the program (https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/exopag/exoexplorers/exoexplorers-call/)

As an ExoGuide, we ask that you present a one hour-long seminar directly to the cohort that speaks to your experiences as a scientist or engineer, and that you participate in one hour-long informal discussion with the cohort. The ExoExplorer organizers are eager to showcase broad, diverse perspectives and therefore encourage you to suggest any topic you might find engaging to the exoplanet community.

ExoGuides should be faculty, staff, or equivalent career stage. We welcome both exoplanet and exoplanet-adjacent scientists and engineers (e.g., disks, stars, instrumentation) from any institution (US and international).

Nominations should be submitted by September 16, 2022. Self-nominations are welcome. The form is linked at: https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/exopag/exoexplorers/exoexplorers-exoguide-call/

The organizers will review nominations and reach out to potential ExoGuides in November. A complete nomination submitted by the deadline will be considered by the Organizing and Steering Committees for three (3) years (i.e. for this year's cohort, next year's cohort, and the year after that). You are welcome to reapply after those three years.


4) Astrophysics Mission Design School (Duration: January 30-April 14, 2023; Application Deadline September 28, 2022)

NASA Science Mission Design Schools

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/intern/apply/nasa-science-mission-design-schools/

NASA Science Mission Design Schools are 3-month-long career development experiences for doctoral students, recent Ph.D.s, postdocs and junior faculty who have a strong interest in science-driven robotic space exploration missions. Participants learn the process of developing a hypothesis-driven robotic space mission in a concurrent engineering environment while getting an in-depth, first-hand look at mission design, life cycle, costs, schedule and the trade-offs inherent in each.

The Science Mission Design Schools are designed to prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers for participation and leadership in space science missions of the future. Experiences are focused on three distinct content areas:

  • The Astrophysics Mission Design School (AMDS) focuses on astrophysics science missions.
  • The Planetary Science Summer School (PSSS) focuses on planetary science and exploration.
  • The Heliophysics Mission Design School (HMDS) focuses on missions to study the Sun and its influence on the rest of the solar system.

Dates: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/intern/apply/nasa-science-mission-design-schools/#dates

Astrophysics Mission Design School 2023:

  • Application Deadline: September 28, 2022
  • Notice of Acceptance: By Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2022
  • Duration: January 30 – April 14, 2023
  • Culminating Week: April 10-14, 2023

Note: Attendance at webinars is required.

Application portal: https://jpleducation-external.jpl.nasa.gov/smds/login

For further information on eligibility, details on the school, FAQ, dates, how to apply, please visit:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/intern/apply/nasa-science-mission-design-schools/

Contact Info:

Program Manager Program Manager: Leslie Lowes, Leslie.L.Lowes@jpl.nasa.gov, (818) 393-7734

Program Support: Joyce Armijo, Joyce.E.Armijo@jpl.nasa.gov, (818) 354-2337


5) Two Astrophysics Medium Explorer Missions and Two Explorer Missions of Opportunity Selected for Mission Concept Studies

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-selects-proposals-to-study-stellar-explosions-galaxies-stars/


6) 2023 Kavli-IAU Astrochemistry Symposium. Astrochemistry VIII - From the First Galaxies to the Formation of Habitable Worlds (July 10-14, 2023, Traverse City, MI, USA)

"Dear All,

We are pleased to announce that the next IAU symposium on astrochemistry will be held in the week from July 10th to 14th 2023 in Traverse City, MI, USA. This symposium will be held as a Kavli-IAU symposium with particular emphasis on fostering interactions also with researchers not traditionally connected to our field. More information about the program and registration will follow soon, but for now please save the dates.

Looking forward to seeing all of you in Traverse City next year. On behalf of the organising committee,

- Paola Caselli, Ted Bergin & Jes Jorgensen

====

Astrochemistry is at the heart of many astrophysical fields, from the early Universe to local galaxies, to star- and planet-formation and evolution in our Milky Way, to exoplanet atmospheres, and to our Solar System. Decades-long concerted efforts of astronomers and theoretical/experimental chemists have provided a solid base for using molecules as powerful diagnostic tools of the physical and chemical structure, dynamics, and history of a multitude of astrophysical objects, allowing connections and glimpses into the life cycle of the interstellar medium, as well as into the growth of chemical complexity in space. The great sensitivity, high angular resolution and frequency coverage of telescopes such as ALMA have allowed unprecedented views of stellar and planet nurseries. JWST with its sensitive near- to mid-infrared spectrometers will soon open a new sensitive and sharp observing window into major molecular ingredients such as water, carbon dioxide as well as other key organic species. JWST will allow us to probe composition of ices on interstellar and planet-forming scales, enabling studies of the linked-chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres and protoplanetary disks. It is therefore timely for the eighth IAU Symposium on Astrochemistry that will allow the ever-growing astrochemical community to meet and discuss recent achievements and future progress including the possibilities of new connections to other fields."


ExoPAG News and Announcements - Archive


NExSS

The Nexus for Exoplanet System Science (NExSS) is a research coordination network whose role is to form a cohesive community of exoplanet researchers that transcends disciplines and funding stovepipes. It is led by teams funded by NASA Research & Analysis Programs from the Astrophysics, Planetary Science, Heliophysics and Earth Science Divisions that conduct interdisciplinary exoplanet research. NExSS helps lead or facilitate white papers, workshops, conferences, science and communications working groups, and other community activities that support exoplanet research.

ExoPAG overview top image - PIA23002 K2-138 6 Planets Artwork